News: Creative Music Guild Launches Fundraiser for 2015 Improvisation Summit

If you were at Mississippi Studios last night, basking in the sound of William Parker, Hamid Drake, and Peter Brotzmann tying themselves together into knots and restructuring every idea you may have about jazz music, you have the Creative Music Guild to thank.

Those tireless volunteers have been doing some incredible work, curating their regular Outset Series concerts and using their meager budget to bring in artists from out of the area to dazzle and intellectually stimulate fans of avant garde music. This year, alone, that has meant incredible performances by Tim Berne’s Snakeoil, Joelle Leandre, John Haughm, Sister Mamie Foreskin, MSHR, and so many more. And did I mention the people working these shows are all volunteer?

All this is to say that the CMG need your help to continue their work, in particular their upcoming Improvisation Summit of Portland, going down at Disjecta on June 4th, 5th, and 6th. The lineup they have in place for this is, as you might imagine, a jaw-dropper: AACM member Roscoe Mitchell, Gordon Ashworth, CATFISH, Brumes, Arrington de Dionyso, Secret Drum Band, and so many more. If your ear is even slightly bent towards experimental sounds, this is a weekend you do not want to miss.

[Oh, and I’m going to be hosting a panel on one of the days, subject TBD. And no, I’m not being compensated for my time. All for the love of the game, fam.]

If you have some extra cash to spare, I encourage you to throw some dough to this cause. Their goal is modest (thanks to the help of the RACC and the other fundraisers they’ve thrown through the year), so this should take little time for them to reach it. As long as you can help out, of course. Click right here to offer your support.

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Music: Moongriffin – Glimpse of Future

One of my few disappointments about this week’s Experimental Portland Radio was that I had to hurry to get the thing finished and out into the world without a track from the new album by Moongriffin. With apologies to Elliott Ross, I knew if I dragged my feet any longer on getting the new episode into the world, it might never have gotten done.

Regardless, your kind attention should be be paid to Glimpse of Future. It’s a marvelously modern jazz record, driven by the sonic playfulness of Ross and his oft-processed guitar and post-production trickery. And he’s joined in the fun by a slew of great players, with an especial nod to Nate Lepine, whose sax and flute work throughout is smartly angular and the scrabbling beats of drummer Charles Rumback. This doesn’t feel like a glimpse at the future, but rather a long, unbroken look that allows you to drink in every detail and rejoice in what’s to come.

And if you like what you hear here, be sure to drop by The Waypost this coming Saturday, where Moongriffin will be celebrating the release of this album and the new label Cartilage Osseux Records with a live performance featuring Tim DuRoche on drums, Andre St. James on bass, and Mike Gamble on guitar.

Podcast: Experimental Portland Radio #010

At long last a new episode. No talking from me right now, just music. Until I get a new microphone, that’s the way it’s gonna be. Deal with it.

Don Haugen – Death Of The King

CATFISH – Addiction
CATFISH leader Joe Cunningham plays with Blue Cranes at Jimmy Mak’s on May 5th

Tim Berne’s Snakeoil – Semi-Self Detached
playing at Jimmy Mak’s on May 5th

Beauty School – A3
playing at Alice Coltrane Memorial Coliseum on May 5th

BEAST – Lock The Jaws
Daniel Menche plays at Turn Turn Turn on May 6th w/ John Haughm

Rich Halley 4 – Crossing The Passes
playing at The Waypost on May 4th

Ceramic Dog – Ritual Slaughter
Marc Ribot plays at Marylhurst University on May 8th

ant’lrd – Betrothed
playing at Beacon Sound on May 8th w/ Pulse Emitter and Opaline

S.H.E. – Over Version
plays at Lovecraft Bar on May 9th as part of Volt Divers

Tetrad Veil – L.W.R.

Music: High Light

I’ve been hearing rumors and discussion about this collaboration between Scott Worley (aka Jatun) and Tim Gray (aka Ethernet) for a long while now. A two-person exploration of modular synth and digital software improvisation brought into the world by two of the smartest players in the experimental electronic game.

The pair are finally making good on their promise with the upcoming release of a cassette/digital album under the name High Light. The three tracks that are available to stream (or to download if you pre-order) are just what a heart needs after the passing of Tangerine Dream leader Edgar Froese. These two locals are carrying the flame of mind-bending swirls of melody and cinematic drones and burbles. The added beauty of this collaboration is that it’s obvious how much the two are listening to each other and growing this sound as a unit. They put their individual musical identities aside for the sake of the whole project.

News: Third Angle Announces 2015-16 Season

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I was lucky enough to spend part of last night in the company of the Third Angle ensemble and one of my favorite writers, Alex Ross of The New Yorker, as the former presented a showcase of 20th and 21st century composers from the West Coast (incl. Lou Harrison, Henry Cowell, and John Luther Adams) with narration and comments from the latter. It was a majestic and challenging and inspiring evening that reaffirmed what amazing work this small organization is doing to keep the spirits of both the chamber recital and contemporary classical music alive.

They also used the evening as an opportunity to announce the next season of Third Angle performances, which you can find here on their website. As expected, it is an impressive series that includes a celebration of Steve Reich’s 80th birthday with the help of the gents from So Percussion (pictured above) that includes the Portland premiere of the composer’s Sextet, an evening dedicated to the Radio Happenings conversations that took place between John Cage and Morton Feldman between 1966 and 1967, and lots of music by contemporary composers like Evan Kuhlmann, Michael van der Aa, and Jay Derderian. It’s such a thrilling selection of performances, so much so that for the first time, I’m trying to see if i can work a full-season subscription into my already tight budget. Maybe I’ll see you there?